Oregon Badlands Wilderness, Pt 3.

In my first earlier post I mentioned the interesting Sulphurflower Buckwheats growing throughout the Badlands. Each seems to have its own unique characteristics and color scheme. This post includes a few more compositions, along with some additional landscapes.

Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 2
Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 2
Badlands Rock Composition 2
Badlands Rock Composition 2 (looking east towards Castle Rock)
Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 1
Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 1
Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 3
Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 3
Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 3
Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 3

Thanks for stopping by. Click on an image to view a high resolution version, or click to see my complete Oregon Badlands Gallery.

Cheers!

C. S.

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Oregon Badlands Wilderness, Pt 2

This post features additional monochrome western juniper tree and lava rock compositions from my visit to the Oregon Badlands Wilderness earlier last month. My previous post included details about this amazing landscape. This was supposed to be a Monochrome Monday post, but I just had too many items on my Labor Day to-do-list. So, its my Monochrome Tuesday, Day After Labor Day post instead.

Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 2
Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 2
Fallen Juniper and Volcanic Rock Composition 1
Fallen Juniper and Volcanic Rock Composition 1
Fallen Juniper Landscape Composition
Fallen Juniper Landscape Composition
Lava Rock Wall Composition 1
Lava Rock Wall Composition 1
Dying Juniper and Lava Rock Composition 1
Dying Juniper and Lava Rock Composition 1

My wife was appalled by my consistent grammatical errors and typos in recent posts. She told me “You don’t want readers to think you’re illiterate!” I told her not to worry, its just my ADD, and me getting a little older. She replied “Just read it out loud before you post!” That sounds like some good advice, I’ll give it a shoot.

Thanks for taking time to visit my photo blog! For the best viewing experience , click on an image to see a high resolution version, as well as other images from my Oregon Badlands Wilderness Gallery. Ha, ha “I’ll give it a shoot”! I’m so silly!

Cheers,

C. S.

Oregon Badland Wilderness

My brother-in-law Jim, his pointer puppy Artie and I arrived at the Badlands Rock Trailhead around 8:30 am on a Tuesday morning.  The Oregon Badlands is about 30 minutes east of Bend in Deschutes and Crook counties.  The high desert area is known for castle-like volcanic rock formations, harsh terrain, ancient Juniper trees, sagebrush, and extensive arid land.

Stately Old Juniper Detail
Stately Old Juniper Detail

The Western Juniper is a prominent feature across the badlands and Oregon high desert.  The durable juniper is known to live more than 1600 years.  Its scraggly bark and gnarly branches are quite impressive.  I suspect the specimen above is well over 200 years old. Ironically, the tree is seen by many scientists and land managers as invasive.  It hogs scarce water resources (12 – 14 inches, or 30 – 35 cm, of rain annually in the badlands), and crowds out native shrubs, grasses and flowers – all of which provide critical wildlife habitat.

Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 1
Splintered Juniper Tree Composition 1

Before settlement of the west in the 1800s, the juniper occupied only 10% the territory it does today.  Up until then, naturally occurring fires kept the tree contained.  But settlers and ranchers have since tended to quickly suppress fires giving the young junipers opportunity to spread.  We did notice along the trail evidence of past fire events.

Dying Juniper Composition 1
Dying Juniper Composition 1

Another interesting feature of the badlands is the volcanic rock formations created by ancient inflated lava flows. Jim, Artie and I climbed the 75 ft (23 m) tall Badland Rock outcropping to get an impressive 360 degree view of Central Oregon. The Badlands soil is composed of sand from eroded volcanic rock and ash from the Mt. Mazama eruption (known today as Crater Lake) some 7,700 years ago.

Badlands Rock Composition 1
Badlands Rock Composition 1

Finally, the high desert landscape is complemented with visual interest from big sagebrush, rabbitbrush, Idaho fescue and bluebunch wheatgrass.  Artie loved bouncing around the thickets of sagebrush and bunchgrasses, sometimes flushing a flight of Mourning doves.  As it was early August, the desert wildflowers were waning, but there was still numerous pink dwarf monkeyflower, Oregon sunshine and sulfur buckwheat to be found.  I particularly found numerous sulfur buckwheat  subjects for photography.

Juniper Root and Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 1
Juniper Root and Sulphur Buckwheat Composition 1

Below is Artie scoping out scenes from the Badland Rock Trail. You can see big sagebrush, rabbitbrush, bunchgrass and junipers mentioned above.

Artie Surveys from Badland Rock Trail
Artie Surveys from Badland Rock Trail

Look for more posts featuring this amazing landscape! For the best viewing experience, click on an image to view a high resolution version from my portfolio site.

Cheers!

C. S.

Linville Gorge: Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Compositions

Last spring my Scout Troop backpacked the northwestern side of Linville Gorge.  Descending into the gorge, numerous hemlock varnish shelf mushrooms (Ganoderma tsugae) clung to various confers along the trail.  Some of these interesting specimens were 16 inches or more in length.  Below you can see a pleasing fungus beetle (Megalodacne heros), which love to eat these mushrooms.

Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 1
Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 1

Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 2
Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 2

Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 3
Hemlock Varnish Shelf Mushroom Composition 3

Linville River Composition
Linville River Composition

Thank you for stopping by today.  For the best viewing experience, click on an image to view a high resolution version from my portfolio site.

Cheers,

C. S.